Healthy Diets Specifically For Teenagers

Individuals in their teens need more concern when planning their food habits. It’s critical that as a teenager that you get all the nutrients you need as you are still growing, however to prevent problems some time down the track, it can be necessary to consider doing something about it if you are overweight. Then what are the criteria for a correct food regime for adolescents? Read on for an overview…

It is always important that you eat healthy especially during your teenage years. Similar to adult diets though, losing weight can be accomplished via a calorie deficit. That is, compared to what you are taking in, you will need to burn more calories. Of course, this does not mean eating too little! Instead, it involves choosing healthful alternatives that include all the necessary nutrients.

The number of calories that can satisfy a teen’s requirements in the process of their rapid development is pretty much what they’ll continue to take in as they turn into adults: two thousand calories for girls and two thousand five hundred for boys.

Teenagers who would like to go for a slimming program are advised to abide by these basic considerations. Burning off more calories than you consume can not only be controlled by what you eat, but it can also be obtained by being more active and taking up some exercise. It is always advisable to put your safety first, so content yourself with a maximum loss of two pounds a week in order to avoid potential health concerns. By monitoring and changing your diet to eat healthy, reduce junk and picking up a little exercise, you hold the answers to losing weight smartly.

Rather than cutting out food, change your focus to choosing healthier food options. As opposed to drinking lots of soda, switch to water instead and you will be surprised just how many calories you have reduced! Have large amounts of fruit and veggies, as they are rich in nutrients.

Computer games are a lot of fun and can keep you hooked for hours at a time. Try to ensure that you have a break from these and do something active. It is recommended that you take part in school team sports or work out at some health club. These can be fun and you won’t even notice that you are helping yourself lose weight in the process. You should aim for 30 minutes of exercise, 4 times a week at least if you want to start seeing a change.

Quick fixes like severe limitation in the amount of food you consume are not suitable solutions for the majority of teenagers, unless their obesity is extreme. Since such fixes might negatively impact your health at a later time, stay away from them. You have a young body and the negative effects might not be visible when you first use them, but given a few years you might discover conditions caused by such choices.

Some eating habits are not suitable for adolescents. The Atkin’s low carb diet for example is one that teenagers should avoid. It cuts out a major food group and doesn’t support a healthy eating plan option whilst encouraging an increase of fat content to lose weight which could be damaging to a teenager.

The South Beach Diet is a finer choice because it doesn’t exclude low GI carbs, enabling you to have foods that belong to all groups.

For young people with ages between 8 and 16, a unique food regime was tailored with their needs in mind as a part of the Zone diet. It is made up of a special ratio of proteins, fats and carbs in its compilation of 3 meals and 2 snacks each day.

Even though the Zone diet and the South Beach diet are claimed to be appropriate for teens, experts prefer other alternatives. In order for the youth to develop properly, the right method is to eat healthy and work out regularly so that their bodies become balanced.

Here’s some good news for those with more dramatic slimming needs out there. Consider a teen diet camp. The advantage of such camps is that you’ll find people there who are trained to motivate and guide you through the dieting process that’s suitable for your goals. There you can be sure you will have to stick to proper nutrition and workouts throughout the duration of the camp. With camps located in the US, Canada and the UK (google it if you require another country), some camps claim that you will lose 4.25lbs per week. It is true that for most teens no more than two pounds per week is advised, but these places are different, since they provide specialized personnel to guide you.

In conclusion, while there might be various ways to reduce weight, the ones that teens will benefit from are those that rely on maintaining a healthy diet and workout. Once you change your diet approach to incorporate it into your lifestyle and throw in a little exercise to boot, you will never have to worry about gaining weight again once you have reached your target.

Raincoats For the Women of Today

Raincoats for women come in many shapes and styles and have been around for a very long time.

Often referred to as a mackintosh, the ‘mack’ has been in existence since the early 1820’s, and was invented by Charles Macintosh.

The mackintosh was a waterproof garment made from rubberized material, similar to the waxed jacket we often see worn by the men and women today.

Originally a practical garment to keep the wearer dry, this outerwear is now much more of a fashion statement. All top designers will include such an item in their collection.

The traditional design has been transformed to suit the needs of the modern woman, which has led to a variety of lengths. You’ll just as easily find a short anorak style rain jacket, as a full length raincoat.

Old heavy style fabrics have been replaced by breathable lightweight materials, which allow them to be packed up neatly into a small bag. Some models also have a hood which may be detachable.

The garment not only come in the single breasted, but also the double breasted, and zipped fastening design. This makes them more suitable to a wider range of customers as body shape, age, and taste, are all catered for.

For the winter you can choose a garment with a faux fur lining, which not only keep you dry but keep you very warm and snug too.

From the ever practical black or beige version to the fluorescent pink worn with matching wellington boots, raincoats for women are available to suit everyone.

Windows 7 Optimizer – Do You Really Need a Registry Optimizer For Windows 7?

A Windows 7 optimizer is not a luxury that you can avoid. Its a necessity given the vulnerability and the complexity involved in programming codes behind the operating system of this age. Why do you need a registry optimizer to clean your Windows 7? This question is propping up in minds of the rising users of the system ‘7’. There are some people who chose not to use a cleaner tool to fix their registry errors. The same is true for this version of the operating system. However, these people do realize at some later stage that their approach was not mindful

Not much time has passed since the launch of Windows 7 but people are starting to experience some errors such as reboot and restart problems, screen out issues and the windows slow speed performance while booting.

Although people do use antivirus and antispyware tools to protect their systems but they do forget one important thing which is the Windows 7 optimizer and cleaner utility. What happens is that people keep various infections away from their system but they don’t have idea that the spyware effect is left in the Windows 7 registry database. Similarly people do clean their systems from viruses and spywares but they don’t pay serious attention to clean the Windows 7 registry which results in the heavily messed up and corrupted registry entries getting accumulated in the registry database.

It is a proven fact that so much trash in the computer is the biggest cause of computer crashes and the decreased system speed. It is important, therefore, to clean registry as well. This can be done through a suitable registry optimizer and cleaner tool which can enhance computer speed function.

Thus using an Windows 7 optimizer is complimentary to other computer protection softwares. If you have already been using the security tools it is wise to add to your list the optimizer software. This will make a very good combination of software to protect your computer from all threats including the registry errors.

This approach has helped so many users to use their computers for long term without any PC crashes and hand problems.

From Goose Farmer to Top Internet Marketer

I was asked the other day ‘What’ it has been that had allowed me to change in such a short period of time my life into better. I was asked what I was doing and which miracle had happened that I had more time and more money at the same time? I was asked if I had found something like an infinite income plan to make money online.

Well, I could have simply answered ‘yes’. But I felt like this was the right moment to going into depth and sharing what I had found and what the ‘secret’ was behind the scenes, behind my change and success: Darren Salkeld’s Infinite Income Plan and how i applied it to learn to earn cash from a top internet marketer and make money online myself – applying what I had learned and am still learning!

Make Money Online Secret Revealed: there was no secret, there is no secret. I wanted to learn to earn cash and simply researched for a real business opportunity online that would meet my criteria. I was blessed to meet Darren Salkeld on an international workshop, where he was presented as a top internet marketer. And this is exactly what Darren Salkeld is and where it all started for me.

The Infinite Income Plan is where Darren Salkeld has put together all his learnings and experience on how to learn to earn cash and make money online. Darren Salkeld put it all together in one place, in the Infinite Income Report.

So who is Darren Salkeld? Today Darren Salkeld stands synonymous for the Infinite Income Plan. Till a few years ago he was a hard working goose farmer and leader in his family business – with a small difference to so many others in his same position: he had a vision! Darren knew that there needed to be some way to learn to earn money and make money online. He went and researched each online marketer he could get hold of and each method he could try, he would do so.

Darren Salkeld today knows all the mechanisms to make money online as he knew how to learn to earn cash and talk with each successful internet marketer he could get hold of. Driven by his vision and solid principles and values that are key to making any income plan and marketing activity a vivid instrument to success, Darren Salkeld has decided to share his knowledge with you and me, with all of us. He even went a step further and created out of his personal instant income plan the infinite income plan which shows all of us a possibility to open our mind to new dimensions.

What attracted me most about the whole Infinite Income Plan, more than all the information on how to learn to earn cash and insights it gives, it is the fact that Darren Salkeld does not talk about tools and techniques only, as many internet marketers do. Darren highlights the importance of our values and believes, of our vision and wish to achieve.

A fast track to learn to earn cash and make money online is part of Darren’s Infinite Income Plan as well as motivational messages and clear guidance on all areas, apart from the pure business aspects, that are all part of our personal success stories.

You can have a list, the famous winning list of people online each internet marketer needs and wants. But it will be of no value if all these people will have no confidence in you. Only the moment that they will trust you, that they will feel that you care for them and about them, only then you will be really able to call your list a winning list! And this is exactly the secret formula that great online marketer Darren Salkeld used and still uses with his Infinite Income Plan.

Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it’s jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.

1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.

1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.

A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.

Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.

Addendum: An addition to; a document.

Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.

Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.

Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower’s loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.

Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.

Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.

Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.

Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.

“As-is”: A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.

Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.

Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.

Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.

Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.

Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.

Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.

Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.

Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.

Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.

Broker’s market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker’s opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.

Broker’s tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.

Buyer: The purchaser of a property.

Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.

Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer’s property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.

Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).

Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.

CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry’s national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.

Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.

Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.

Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.

Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.

Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association’s expenses and savings.

Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.

Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.

Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.

Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.

Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.

Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.

Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.

Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.

Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer’s agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage’s listing.

Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.

Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.

Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower’s credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.

Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower’s credit report based on information contained therein.

Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.

Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.

Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.

Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.

Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.

DOM: Days on market.

Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.

Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential li

Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.

Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer’s good faith.

Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.

Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.

Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.

Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.

Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client’s reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.

Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.

FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.

Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.

Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.

For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.

Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.

Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.

Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.

Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.

Homeowner’s insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.

HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.

Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.

IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other’s listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.

Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.

Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.

Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee’s property stating that property is being sold “as is.” All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer’s duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.

Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.

Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.

Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.

List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.

List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.

Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.

Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.

Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent’s agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.

Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.

Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.

Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.

Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.

Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower’s loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.

Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.

Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower’s lender sends to the closing or escrow.

Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer’s funds and the borrower’s loan for closing.

Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer’s loan.

Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.

Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.

Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company’s contract with the employer.

Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank’s funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.

Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.

Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.

Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.

Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.

National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.

Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.

Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.

Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.

Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.

Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority’s tracking number for a property.

Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.

Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.

Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.

Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrowe
r must meet.

Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.

Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.

Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.

Preview appointment: When a buyer’s agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer’s needs.

Pricing: When the potential seller’s agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.

Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.

Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower’s monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.

Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.

Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.

Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.

R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.

Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker’s license must work for a licensed broker.

Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).

REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.

Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.

Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.

Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.

Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.

Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.

Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.

Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer’s agent (preview).

Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.

State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.

Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.

Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.

Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.

Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.

Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.

Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.

24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.

Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.

VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.

VOW’s (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.

W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.

W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.

Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.

Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.

A Resource Buying Guide For Internet Marketers

The “make money online” crowd is probably the most actively targeted niche market on the internet. Which is quite ironic when you think about it; “The hunters become the hunted.” And it’s not surprising we are so serviced with offers continually, the truth is we are, on the whole, information junkies. We are suckers for a good ebook, report, or video.

The problem is that an over supply of internet marketing tools (even good ones) can leave you feeling overwhelmed, unproductive (too busy reading about internet marketing to actually DO any), and flat broke!

So how do we filter the offers we are bombarded with, so that we invest sanely in our education and resources?  Let me offer this simple “buying guide” to help.

When you boil it all down there are basically 4 different kinds of products on the market, and you have to be able to recognize them so you don’t waste your time and money:

1) Basic training guides & tools. Everyone needs some of these, but you don’t need to be buying 10 versions of the exact same information.

2) Advanced techniques. These are the “Shazaam!” products.  The ones with truly unique and creative ideas. If I can identify which ones these are, I’ll buy them all day long. If I can get ONE really good, repeatable idea, it is money in the bank.  The caveat, though, is you’ve got to actually implement them – otherwise you’re just wasting your money, and spinning your wheels.

3) Tools that make life easier.  These are OK if you’ve got disposable money to spend on them, but if you’ve got a limited budget (like most marketers that are still getting going) you’re probably better off spending it where it can be best leveraged for the most effectiveness.

Case in point: At the time that I’m writing this article I’ve been getting emails all week — I’ve had at least 15 just today – promoting a particular hot product.  The free teaser report is great — it includes a couple of really exciting ideas (see point 2).  However, when I looked at what is actually being offered in the main package – 8 software programs that collate information in various forms from around the internet — they’re all really cool tools, but they are nothing that you can’t already do yourself for free. Cool, but not necessary. Convenient, but not essential.

4) Snake oil. These are the products that are thrown together to make sales to newbies, but they do not work. They are bad advice. You’ll discover that usually the author hasn’t had any success with the method he’s teaching at all, but he can make a few bucks wasting other people’s time with it.

So, when you’re considering buying resources to help you build your online business, read the sales copy discerningly.  Honestly evaluate the product and classify it in one of the above 4 categories.  Then it’s a simple decision to make the appropriate response:

Category 1:  Buy it if you don’t already have a product covering the same topic, or if you are reasonably convinced that your understanding is going to be increased sufficiently to justify the investment.

Category 2:  Buy it, and DO something with it! Don’t procrastinate — take action.  Winners are taking imperfection actions while others are still formulating their “perfect” plans.

Category 3:  Buy it only if you have surplus cash, and don’t mind blowing some on a luxury — because that’s what it is.  Ask yourself, “Could I leverage the money I’m about to spend on this to better effect in my business?”

Category 4:  Click that little “x” button at the top of the browser window, and be proud of yourself that you’ve developed the wisdom and experience to stop wasting time with that kind of rubbish.  If you already bought it before you figured out that its “snake oil”, ask for a refund and chalk it up to experience.

Buying is far more an emotional decision for us than we “savvy entrepreneurs” would care to admit. Anything we can do to take pause and inject some thought into the process will save us time and money. This buying guide offers a place to start.

Travel Nurse Jobs

Travel nursing jobs is one of the fastest features of the nursing career, which has stormed the nursing profession and getting popularity with each passing day. Shortage of quality nurses, underpaid, love for traveling, whatever the reason, it has become a huge hit among young women who dare to dream big. If you share the passion of serving mankind and adventure to see the world and feel its diversity, the option is fit for you.

Travel nursing jobs are basically temporary jobs normally for a period of six weeks to twelve weeks. Normally, travel nursing agency, which specializes in providing quality human power, does provide placements for nurses in different regions. The agency is responsible for hiring, accommodating, payments and providing other benefits of nursing jobs. Usually, agency has a cordial relation with various hospitals, nursing centers and other medical practitioners who provide regular need of travel nurses in their area. The agency further processes the required vacancy and call ladies who shown interest in traveling as a part of their jobs.

Once, the hiring process gets completed, travel nursing agency undertakes the responsibility for preparing the contracts, where all the terms and conditions are mentioned. Sometimes, travel nursing agency looks after the visa, passports and work permit matters of nurses too. The agency does everything to satisfy the parties, the recruiter and the job seeker. In case, nurses like to prolong their assignment tenure, agency provides arrangement for that too.

These temporary jobs not only provide experiences of nursing but also give a chance to see the geographical variation. People who like to travel can really find this job useful and learning. Further, the job of travel nursing teaches to adjust according to the situation’s demand. Because of its great advantages, nursing jobs has attracted many young ladies to explore their dream of nursing and to gain experiences of the world.

Best Ways to Prospect in Commercial Real Estate Today

The prospecting process in commercial real estate is a daily event or at least it should be for every salesperson. There are four ways to contact your prospects, and whilst I will explain of those four strategies here, only two of them are highly successful.

When you understand and appreciate the value of the two best prospecting methods, you can convert more commercial real estate business opportunity and listings in your local market. The other two methods in the main are a waste of time and effort.

So here are the four methods of prospecting that you can use. They can be mixed or combined as the case may be. As only two of them will be highly successful, I will define those two at the end of the article.

  1. Sending an e-mail to a prospect regards your services and commercial real estate activity is easy and convenient. Many agents do this on a regular daily basis. You can combine with the e-mail relevant attachments and information regards the local property market and property types available for sale or lease.
  2. The traditional direct mail approach still occurs today although less frequently. To send direct mail, you need to have the necessary contact details of the people concerned. Generic mail without personally addressed correspondence is a waste of time. If you are sending direct mail, make sure you understand the correct title and name of the relative person.
  3. The telephone is a very convenient method of contact when it comes to prospecting for new business. The rejection factor or ratio in cold calling activities is rather high although this should not put you off the process.
  4. Dropping into a business or a local address to introduce yourself as the commercial real estate expert should happen on a daily basis. You can do this on a street by street basis. Identify the local businesses in each street and then visit five of them each day. Leave your business card as part of the process. You ask them questions regards their property needs, or property usage, and if they are a tenant or an owner.

So, two of the above items are far more successful than the others. Most particularly they are the use of the telephone and dropping into the local businesses. These activities should occur daily as they will strengthen your market share very quickly.

It should be noted that the direct mail approach is still highly effective although you should always follow up the letter with a telephone call. Direct mail without follow-up is a waste of money.

The most convenient and yet less effective way of marketing today is the email process. Most business people get many emails on a daily basis and therefore will be inclined to delete unnecessary emails that are of general information. If you are going to implement the email process as part of your marketing model, make sure you have the consent of the person concerned so that you can personalise the process. As regularly as possible, make sure you follow the emails are up with a telephone call.

How an Online Travel Agency Help in Planning your Trip

Through the Internet, people today can look for information about any product or service they need in a fast, easy, and convenient way. For instance, if you’re planning a cruise trip, you can use search engines to find a website that offers travel packages. These travel agencies’ websites provide details and anything you need to know about cruise vacations. To know more about this, here are some facts on how an online travel agency can make planning your trip easier.

When browsing a travel agency’s website, you can find information on available itineraries, cruise tours, and shore and rail excursions. Through this platform, you can input details on where you like to go, when and how long you prefer to travel, and which departure port is most convenient for you and your group. Read through the agency’s travel insurance policies posted online to know if these cover medical expenses, trip cancellation, baggage damage, and other possible emergency situations.

Like your local travel agencies, online experts provide basic information about what a cruise trip, for example, entails.

They post information about pre-travel requirements, onboard experiences, activities, and amenities, as well as the different ports you and your fellow passengers can visit during the trip. They also give an overview about the life aboard a cruise ship: the dining options, accommodation arrangements, planned activities for people of all ages, and facilities and amenities for relaxation and entertainment.

An online travel agency Minneapolis has to offer also provides a wide range of options for specific cruise lines and ships.

You can choose a luxury, premium, contemporary, or specialty cruise line that suits your budget, adventure needs, and travel preferences. You can view cruise ships’ deck plans, onboard activities, sophisticated environment, and thus decide which travel package will work best for you and your group.

To maximize your budget, consult an experienced travel agency St Paul residents go to for special offers and competitive prices. You can read through their current promotions and get discounts from cruise lines or land-tour operators in their business network. You can also choose a wonderful cruise vacation package inclusive of full cruise fare, pre- and post-hotel accommodations, and other add-ons through their website.

Websites in general serve as a reliable source of information for people. With online
travel agents Minneapolis companies employ, you can plan your trip faster and in a considerably more convenient way. Through their website, you can also subscribe to email promotions, access quick links, and learn about a desired trip with a few clicks. These make planning a big, budget-friendly adventure easier.

Age Appropriate and Attractive Ideas For Aging Gracefully

Maturity is a badge of honor to be respected with good taste. There simply comes a time when all the extra bling and fabulousness of fashion, hair and makeup is best toned down. When you were a younger Alluring, Innovative or Dramatic woman, those items of “look at me, I’m au currant” stood for something. Status, hipness, a woman in the moment who’s up on the trend. But wisdom carries with it a confidence and sophistication that allows you to do less and achieve more. A maturing face and figure carries a patina of wisdom. A statement in and of itself, it doesn’t require bright lips, over the top earrings or a crazy hip belt to bring it forward. It stands there, gently making its own beautiful statement. Less is simply more as we age. To accentuate your second act best:

o    Avoid drawing attention to your mouth with bright or dark lips.
o    Avoid drawing attention to aging eyelids with frosted shadow.
o    Avoid drawing attention to aging hands with bright nail polish and/or a multitude of attention-grabbing rings.
o    Draw the eye to your face with neckline interest and earrings.
o    When in doubt leave it out.

The Importance of Being Current 

Keeping current is undoubtedly a constant and not inexpensive challenge. With all the technology with which we are bombarded, however, we still have the old standby; the monthly magazine. Magazine subscriptions are one of the most effective ways of getting information you can absorb on your downtime. The whole experience of sitting down with and perusing a magazine that inspires is a ritual that endures. Magazines are the great equalizer. No matter where you live in the country you have the same access to fashion, fitness and beauty that the most upscale, in-the-know New York socialite has, because she gets her “W” magazine the same time you do. When “O” comes out, you’re right there with all of Oprah’s associates on the hottest, latest and most suitable fashion, food, fun and inspiration you need that month. You just go to your mailbox, Oprah is waiting for you, and it’s your turn to dream. 

What Were We Thinking?

We’ve all done it. Looked back at those embarrassing fashion photos and wondered, “What was I thinking?” I look back at my pinstriped jeans, permed hair and parachute pants and think “Hmmmm.” The more extreme trend, the more risk of later embarrassment. We may forgive the young. But it’s not so easy to forgive a second actor in a leather mini.

A woman in Act Two need never wear:

1.     A micro mini
2.     Combat boots with formal wear
3.     White hose
4.     Frosted eye shadow
5.     Chunky platforms
6.     Dark brown lipstick
7.     Butterfly barrettes
8.     Extreme low-rise jeans
9.     Visible underwear
10.   A spiral perm

What’s Age Appropriate Now?

In our Second Act it becomes difficult to find the balance between matronly and modern. Looking current and youthful should not translate into “mutton dressed as lamb.” I met a woman recently whose long, blonde, permed hair was pulled up on one side and suspended with a comb. For height she created gravity defying bangs with a curling iron and “Spritz Forte.” She wore a fitted navy knit tank, tight tapered pale denim jeans and a crocheted sparkly baby blue shawl tied around her hips. She was 48. 

I liked her and enjoyed hearing her tales of woe in raising teenagers. But as I listened I was continually distracted by her image. It just wasn’t working in her favor. The reason it didn’t work was because it was expressing only a part of this woman. I obviously knew who she had been, but as she talked, the more interesting experienced and attractive parts were hidden behind a façade of fear of aging. Yes, she was attractive and sexy but she was also a 48-year-old single mother of teenagers who had quite a bit of sun damage, an advancing derriere, tan lines across her back and thinning hair. The look did not make her look younger; it made her look vulnerable and insecure. Our image must reflect who we’ve become, not who we were. That is age appropriate.